AP U.S. History Syllabus

 

 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY

 

 

Course Description

This course is taught following theguidelines of the College Board and the North Carolina Standard Course of Studyfor AP U.S. History.  It is designed toprovide students with analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to dealcritically with the problems and materials in Unites States History.  Students will analyze historical material,synthesize their own ideas, and evaluate those of others.  The course will develop the skills necessaryto arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to presentreasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format.  Strands include:  geographic relationships, historicalperspectives, economics, development of government, global connections,influences of technology, social development, and cultural diversity. 

 

Course Requirements

            This courseis designed to be the equivalent of a college course in U.S. History and toprepare students to take the Advanced Placement U.S. History exam.  Since this class is taught on block scheduleall students are required to have successfully completed the Honors U.S.History course.  Much more extensivereading and writing outside the classroom will be required than that which isrequired in the standard or honors level course.  Since this course focuses on analysis andsynthesis, students should already have a good base of factual knowledge ofAmerican History from which to build.

 

Course Texts and Readings

 

Kennedy, David M., Lizabeth Cohen, and Thomas A. Bailey, The American Pageant:  A Historyof the Republic.  Twelfth Edition.  Boston:Houghton Mifflin, 2002

 

Kennedy, David M. and Thomas A. Bailey, eds.   The American Spirit:  United States History as Seen by Contemporaries.  Vols. 1 and 2.   TenthEdition.  Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2002

 

Couvares, Francis G., Martha Saxton, Gerald N. Grob, andGeorge Athan Billias, eds.  Interpretations of American History:  Patterns and Perspectives.  Vols. 1 and 2.  Seventh Edition.  NewYork:  The FreePress, 2000

 Various articles and handouts

 Course Outline

 Unit 1: Colonial History

 

Readings:

            Text: The American Pageant, Chapters 1-4

            PrimarySources: The American Spirit 1-4

            Essays:  Interpretationsof American History, Vol. I, Number 2 “The Puritans:  Orthodoxy orDiversity?”  (Essays by Perry Miller/Thomas H. Johnson and Philip Gura)

            Handouts

 

Themes:

1.      Theemergence of American cultural traits and the factors that contributed to them

2.      Emergingregional patterns and how they evolved.

 

Content:

            Motives and methods ofcolonization:  Spain,France, Britain

            Push-pull factors bringingcolonists to the New World

            Comparison and contrast ofSouthern, Middle, and New England political,            Culturaldifferences between Americans and Europeans

             

Major assignments andassessments:

            Develop acolony chart:  List each colony, thefounding date, method of founding, motivation for founding, and importantpeople/events associated with each. 

 

 

Unit 2:  Independence 

 

Readings

            Text: The American Pageant, Chapters 5-8

            PrimarySources: The American Spirit 5-8

            Handouts

 

Themes:

1.      Theemergence of an “American” culture

2.      Thechanging nature of the colonies’ relationship with Great Britain and with     each other

3.      Thesocial effects of the Revolution


 

Content:

            Colonial society in mid 1700’s

            French and Indian War

            British policy changes after1763

            Emerging colonial cooperationand decision for independence

            Military victory and Treaty ofParis

 

Major assignments andassessments:

            Essay practice:  Organize essential sentences in an essay(“The Colonies by 1763-     ---A NewSociety?”) and complete supplementary details.

            Completion of chart on Britishpolicies and colonial reactions to them

            Evaluation of written essay:  “The Revolution as a Social Movement” by J. FranklinJameson

            2004 DBQ:   “TheFrench and Indian War” 

            Test:  Units 1-2

 

 

UNIT 3: Post-Independence and theCritical Period

 

Readings:

             Text:  TheAmerican Pageant, Chapters 9-11

             PrimarySources: The American Spirit, 9-11

             Essays: TheInterpretation of American History, Vol. I, Number 6 “TheConstitution:  Conflict orConsensus?”  (Essays by Gordon S. Woodand John Howe)

            Handouts

 

Themes:

1.     Development of the United States Constitution and Billof Rights

2.     The emergence of political parties and the factors thatdivided them

3.     Development of an American foreign policy

4.     The conflict between national power and states rights

 

Content:

            Governmentunder the Articles of Confederation

      Constitutional Convention

Ø     Personalities

Ø     Compromises

Ø     Controversies

Ø     Ratification

Hamiltonverses Jefferson

      British-French conflict and its impact onAmerican politics

Ø     Trade

Ø     Achievements and failures of diplomacy:  Jay’s Treaty, Pinckney’s Treaty, XYZ Affair,Convention of 1800

Ø     Alien and Sedition Acts

The election of1800

Louisiana Purchase

 

Major assignments and assessments:

Graphicorganizer:  Identify the opinions ofJefferson and Hamilton on major issues of the time period.

Assume role ofJohn Quincy Adams and prepare a report on U.S. foreign policy as you assumethe presidency in 1825.

DBQ:  The Articles of Confederation or Alienand Sedition Acts

 

 

Unit 4: Growth of Nationalism and Jacksonian Democracy

 

Readings:

Text:  TheAmerican Pageant  Chapters 12-15

PrimarySources:  The American Spirit  12-15

Essays:  TheInterpretation of American History, Vol. I, Number 7, “The ExpandingNation:  Pioneers or Planners?” (essaysby John Mack Faragher and Carol Sheriff)

Handouts

 

Themes: 

1.     The rise of nationalism

2.     The effects of national expansion----geographic,democratic, and economic

3.     Reform movements and the American character

 

Content:

            Warof 1812

Clay’s AmericanSystem

Monroe Doctrine

Election of Jackson

Ø     Spoils system

Ø     Nullification

Ø     Bank War

Ø     Indian Removal

Marshall CourtDecisions

The “old”immigrants

Second GreatAwakening

Reforms

Ø     Education

Ø     Treatment of the mentally ill and criminals

Ø     Abolition

Ø     Temperance

Ø     Women’s rights

Ø     Utopian communities


 

Major assignments and assessments:

“Nationalism”project:  Prepare a portfolio to include(1) a brief explanation and contribution to nationalism of:  Louisiana Purchase, Embargo of 1807, War of1812, Marshall Court Decisions, Adams-Onis Treaty, Monroe Doctrine (2) creationof a visual to show how the American System economically unified the countryand (3) examples of cultural developments showing emergence of nationalism inart, architecture, and literature.

Completion ofchart on various social, political, economic, and religious issues during theJeffersonian and Jacksonian eras to show the evolution of democracy.

Essay:  “To what extent did Andrew Jackson’spresidency usher in a new era in American politics?”

Test:  Units 3-4

 

Unit 5: Slavery and Sectionalism  

 

Readings:

            Text:   TheAmerican Pageant  Chapters 16-19

PrimarySources:  The American Spirit  16-19

Handouts

 

Themes:

  1. Manifest Destiny
  2. Slavery as a social and economic institution
  3. Sectionalism

 

Content:

      The Mexican War

      The politics of slavery

Ø     MissouriCompromise

Ø     Compromise of 1850

Ø     Kansas-Nebraska Act

Ø     Dred Scott Decision

Ø     Lincoln-Douglas Debates

Ø     John Brown’s Raid

Ø     Election of 1860

 

Major assignments and assessments

Map:  Territorial expansion to 1853 and evaluationof sectional differences.

Graphicorganizer showing conflicts and compromises leading to Civil War

Writing assignment:“Letter from Kansas”  Assume the role of a settler in Kansas

Territory  and write a letter to your family back in North Carolina  explaining the

situation there.

DBQ:  The 1850’s: Prelude to the Civil War or 2005B DBQ: Failure of Compromise by 1860.


 

Unit 6: Civil War and Reconstruction  

 

Readings:

            Text:  TheAmerican Pageant  Chapters 20-22

            PrimarySources:  The American Spirit  20-22

            Essays:The Interpretation of American History,Vol. I, Number 10, “The Civil War: Repressible or Irrepressible?” (essays by Allan Vevins and William W. Freehling) and Vol. Two, Number 2“Reconstruction:  Change or Stasis?”  (essays by Jonathan M. Wiener and Eric Foner)

            Handouts

 

Themes:

1.     Secession and war

2.     Reconstruction issues and plans

3.     The struggle for equality

 

Content:

            Militarystrategies, strengths and weaknesses, events and outcomes

            Thehome front, North and South

Ø     Mobilizing manpower, finances, public opinion

Ø     Social, economic, and political impact of thewar

Presidential vs.congressional Reconstruction plans and actions

Post wareconomic developments in the South

1877 Compromiseand Home Rule

 

Major Assignments and Assessments:

Writtenassignment:  Research and report on localhistory----The Battle of Goldsboro Bridge, The Battle of Whitehall, or theBattle of Bentonville

Small groupactivity:  Create your own plan forreconstruction

            1996DBQ:  Civil War and Reconstruction

            Test: Units 5-6

           

 

Unit 7:  The Gilded Age 

 

Readings:

            Text:  TheAmerican Pageant  Chapters 23-26

            Primarysources:  The American Spirit:  23-26

            Essays:  TheInterpretation of American History, Vol. II, Number 5, “The NewImmigration:  Assimilation or EthnicPluralism?” (essays by James R. Barrett and George J. Sanchez)

            Handouts                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 


 

Themes:

1.     Politics during the late 1800’s

2.     The implications of the growth of American industry

3.     Settlement of the Great West

4.     Agrarian discontent

 

Content:

Corruption inpolitics at all levels of government

            CivilService Reform

            Tariffissues

            Newtechnologies

            Riseof big business and big businessmen

            Riseof organized labor

            Growthof cities

            The“new” immigrants

            Governmentpolicies regarding Native Americans

            Farming,mining, and ranching

            Turner’sthesis

            Populism        

 

 

Major Assignments and Assessments:

            Evaluationof DBQ type documents and questions on the philosophy of the industrialists

            Createyour own DBQ:  Evaluate documents andcreate a question for a DBQ on the Populist movement.

           

 

Unit 8: Imperialism and Progressivism

 

Readings

            Text:  TheAmerican Pageant  Chapters 27-30

            PrimarySources:  The American Spirit:  27-30

            Essays:  The Interpretation of American History, Vol.II, Number 4, “ American Imperialism: Economic Expansion or Ideological Crusade?”  (Essays by Walter LaFeber and Gerald F.Linderman)

            Handouts

 

Themes:

1.      Thechanging role of the UnitedStates in world affairs

2.      Effortsto improve American society by the Progressive reformers


 

Content: 

            Hawaii and PacificIslands

            Spanish-AmericanWar

            The “OpenDoor” Policy

            The Panama Canal

            TheRoosevelt Corollary to the MonroeDoctrine

            Reformmovements:

Ø     Women’s suffrage

Ø     Increased government regulation of business

Ø     Consumer protection

Ø     Conservation

Ø     Temperance to Prohibition

            Taft’s“Dollar Diplomacy”

            Wilson as a Progressive

 

Major Assignments andAssessments:

            WritingAssignment:  Would you be an advocate forAmerican imperialism or be counted with the anti-imperialists?  Choose one side or the other and construct anessay to support your position.

            Develop achart on causes of the Spanish American War including a description of theevent and the significance of each as a cause of the war

            DBQ 2003B   The Progressive Era

            Test:  Unit 7-8

 

 

 

Unit 9:  WorldWar I, The Roaring Twenties and theGreat Depression

 

Readings

            Text:  TheAmerican Pageant Chapters  31, 32,33,and 34

            PrimarySources:  The American Spirit  31, 32,33 and 34

            Essays:  TheInterpretation of American History, Vol. II, Number 7, “The New Deal:  Revolution or Restoration?” (essays byWilliam E. Leuchtenburg and Alan Dawley)

            Handouts

 

 

Themes:

            1..United Statesinvolvement in WWI:  Motives, commitment,and post war agreements

            2.  The 1920’s

                        Socialchanges

                        Governmentpolicies and politics

                        Demographicchanges and cultural conflicts

                        Economic“Boom”

            3.  The 1930’s

                        Economic“Bust”

                        Depression

                        “NewDeal” and the changing role of the Federal Government in American society

                       

Content:

            AmericanExpeditionary Force

            Wilson’s “moral” diplomacyand the Treaty of Versailles

            Propagandaand Civil Liberties:  The Espionage andSedition Acts

            The Women’sMovement

            RepublicanPresidents and pro-business policies

            Fundamentalismand the Scopes Trial

            The RedScare

                        Saccoand Vanzetti

                        ImmigrationRestrictions

                        ThePalmer Raids

            Prohibitionand organized crime

            The economyin the 1920’s:  consumers, speculators,and farmers

            The StockMarket Crash

            The DustBowl

            Life duringthe Depression

            FDR and theNew Deal

                        “AlphabetSoup”

                        The“court packing scheme”

                        “GoodNeighbor” Policy

                        Gainsfor labor----the Wagner Act     

 

Major Assignments andAssessments:

            Completion of graphic organizercomparing the urban and rural views of the major issues of the 1920’s

            Develop achart on New Deal programs including the name, purpose, and whether the programwould fit into the category of relief, recovery, or reform

            2003DBQ:  FDR’s response to the Depression

            Test:  Unit 9

                                   

                                   

Unit 10:  WWIIand The Beginning of the Cold War

 

Readings

            Text:  TheAmerican Pageant:  Chapters 35, 36,and 37

            PrimarySources:  The American Spirit:  35, 36,and 37        

            Handouts

 

Themes:

1.      Americanmilitary commitment:  fighting the war inEurope and the Pacific

2.      WWIIon the home front:  mobilization anddemobilization

3.      TheUnited States’new role in the post war world

4.      Dealingwith communism

 

Content:

            Turningpoints of the war

            Islandhopping

            Manhattan project

            Japaneseinternment

            The UnitedNations

            TrumanDoctrine

            Containment

            MarshallPlan

            Israel

            Post waradjustments

Ø     “Baby Boom”

Ø     Levittowns

Ø     Demographic shifts:  suburbs and the sunbelt

Korean War

 

Major Assignments andAssessments:

Discussion and questions on WWIIconferences

            Groupreports on comparisons of WWI and WWII including neutrality policies, home front,goals, relations with allies, role in fighting the war, and post war position

 

 

Unit 11:  The1950’s, 1960’s, and 1970’s

 

Readings:

            Text:  The American Pageant:  Chapters 38, 39, and 40

            PrimarySources:  The American Spirit  38, 39, and 40

            Essays:  TheInterpretation of American History, Vol. II, Number 8, “America and The Cold War:  Containment or Hegemony?” (essays by JohnLewis Gaddis and H.W. Brands)

            Handouts

 

Themes:

1.      U.S.involvement in the continuing Cold War

2.      Changesin American society:  Conformity tocounterculture

3.      Thestruggle for civil rights and equality

4.      Checksand balances at work in American politics

5.      Continuedinfluence of New Deal on the government’s role in society

 

Content:

            TheEisenhower Doctrine

            The Suez Crisis

            McCarthyism

            U-2Incident

            Bay of Pigs

            The CubanMissile Crisis

            The spacerace and the arms race

            The VietnamWar

            Hippies andprotests

            Brown v.Board of Education

            The CivilRights Movement

Ø     Martin Luther King

Ø     The MontgomeryBus Boycott

Ø     Freedom Rides

Ø     Freedom Summer

Ø     Malcolm X

Ø     The Black Panthers

            LyndonJohnson and social programs

            Nixon andTriangular Diplomacy

            RichardNixon and Watergate

            Ford andCarter

            Israelis,Arabs, and oil

            Warren Courtdecisions

            Feminism

 

Major Assessments andAssignments:

            CivilRights Oral History Report:  Conduct aninterview with someone who can remember the time before the Civil Rightsmovement and write the story of his/her experiences before, during, and afterthe movement.

            Completionof graphic organizer to compare the New Deal and the Great Society

            Test: Units10-11

 

 

Unit 12:  The1980’s and Beyond

 

Readings:

            Text:  TheAmerican Pageant Chapters 41 and 42

            The American Spirit  41 and 42

            Handouts

 

Themes:

  1. The resurgence of conservativism
  2. The end of the Cold War
  3. Emergence of “postindustrial” economy
  4. New “new” immigrants

 

Content:

            “Reaganonmics”

            MikhailGorbachev

            The PersianGulf War

            The Reagan,Bush, and Clinton presidencies

 

Major Assignments andAssessments:

            AP Review:  Whole class group chooses criteria fordetermining Presidential greatness. Small groups rank Presidents in different time periods and report towhole class to rank the top and bottom five.

            AP Review:  Complete chart of twenty-two dates giving theevent for each date and its significance as a turning point in U.S. History

            APReview:  U.S. History “Jeopardy” type game

            Final Exam

            




ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY

  

Course Description

This course is taught following the guidelines of the College Board and the North Carolina Standard Course of Study for AP U.S. History.  It is designed to provide students with analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in Unites States History.  Students will analyze historical material, synthesize their own ideas, and evaluate those of others.  The course will develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format.  Strands include:  geographic relationships, historical perspectives, economics, development of government, global connections, influences of technology, social development, and cultural diversity. 

 

Course Requirements

            This course is designed to be the equivalent of a college course in U.S. History and to prepare students to take the Advanced Placement U.S. History exam.  Since this class is taught on block schedule all students are required to have successfully completed the Honors U.S. History course.  Much more extensive reading and writing outside the classroom will be required than that which is required in the standard or honors level course.  Since this course focuses on analysis and synthesis, students should already have a good base of factual knowledge of American History from which to build.

 

Course Texts and Readings

 

Kennedy, David M., Lizabeth Cohen, and Thomas A. Bailey, The American Pageant:  A History of the Republic.  Twelfth Edition.  Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2002

 Kennedy, David M. and Thomas A. Bailey, eds.   The American Spirit:  United States History as Seen by Contemporaries.  Vols. 1 and 2.   Tenth Edition.  Boston:  Houghton Mifflin, 2002

 Couvares, Francis G., Martha Saxton, Gerald N. Grob, and George Athan Billias, eds.  Interpretations of American History:  Patterns and Perspectives.  Vols. 1 and 2.  Seventh Edition.  New York:  The Free Press, 2000

 Various articles and handouts

 Course Outline

 

Unit 1:  Colonial History

 

Readings:

      Text: The American Pageant, Chapters 1-4
        Primary Sources: The American Spirit 1-4
  Essays:  Interpretations of American History, Vol. I, Number 2  “The Puritans:                Orthodoxy or Diversity?”  (Essays by Perry Miller /Thomas H. Johnson and Philip Gura)

            Handouts

 

Themes:

  1. The emergence of American cultural traits and the factors that contributed to them
  2. Emerging regional patterns and how they evolved.

 Content:

            Motives and methods of colonization:  Spain, France, Britain

            Push-pull factors bringing colonists to the New World

            Comparison and contrast of Southern, Middle, and New England colonies            Cultural differences between Americans and Europeans

             

Major assignments and assessments:

            Develop a colony chart:  List each colony, the founding date, method of founding, motivation for founding, and important people/events associated with each. 

 

 

Unit 2:  Independence 

 

Readings

            Text: The American Pageant, Chapters 5-8

            Primary Sources: The American Spirit 5-8

            Handouts

 

Themes:

  1. The emergence of an “American” culture
  2. The changing nature of the colonies’ relationship with Great Britain and with     each other
  3. The social effects of the Revolution


 

Content:

            Colonial society in mid 1700’s

            French and Indian War

            British policy changes after 1763

            Emerging colonial cooperation and decision for independence

            Military victory and Treaty of Paris

 

Major assignments and assessments:

            Essay practice:  Organize essential sentences in an essay (“The Colonies by 1763-     ---A New Society?”) and complete supplementary details.

            Completion of chart on British policies and colonial reactions to them

            Evaluation of written essay:  “The Revolution as a Social Movement” by J. Franklin Jameson

            2004 DBQ:   “The French and Indian War” 

            Test:  Units 1-2

 

 

UNIT 3:  Post-Independence and the Critical Period

 

Readings:

             Text:  The American Pageant, Chapters 9-11

             Primary Sources: The American Spirit, 9-11

             Essays: The Interpretation of American History, Vol. I, Number 6 “The Constitution:  Conflict or Consensus?”  (Essays by Gordon S. Wood and John Howe)

            Handouts

 

Themes:

  1. Development of the United States Constitution and Bill of Rights
  2. The emergence of political parties and the factors that divided them
  3. Development of an American foreign policy
  4. The conflict between national power and states rights

 

Content:

            Government under the Articles of Confederation

      Constitutional Convention

  • Personalities
  • Compromises
  • Controversies
  • Ratification

Hamilton verses Jefferson

      British-French conflict and its impact on American politics

  • Trade
  • Achievements and failures of diplomacy:  Jay’s Treaty, Pinckney’s Treaty, XYZ Affair, Convention of 1800
  • Alien and Sedition Acts

The election of 1800

Louisiana Purchase

 

Major assignments and assessments:

Graphic organizer:  Identify the opinions of Jefferson and Hamilton on major issues of the time period.

Assume role of John Quincy Adams and prepare a report on U.S. foreign policy as you assume the presidency in 1825.

DBQ:  The Articles of Confederation or Alien and Sedition Acts

 

 

Unit 4:  Growth of Nationalism and Jacksonian Democracy

 

Readings:

Text:  The American Pageant  Chapters 12-15

Primary Sources:  The American Spirit  12-15

Essays:  The Interpretation of American History, Vol. I, Number 7, “The Expanding Nation:  Pioneers or Planners?” (essays by John Mack Faragher and Carol Sheriff)

Handouts

 

Themes: 

  1. The rise of nationalism
  2. The effects of national expansion----geographic, democratic, and economic
  3. Reform movements and the American character

 

Content:

            War of 1812

Clay’s American System

Monroe Doctrine

Election of Jackson

  • Spoils system
  • Nullification
  • Bank War
  • Indian Removal

Marshall Court Decisions

The “old” immigrants

Second Great Awakening

Reforms

  • Education
  • Treatment of the mentally ill and criminals
  • Abolition
  • Temperance
  • Women’s rights
  • Utopian communities


 

Major assignments and assessments:

“Nationalism” project:  Prepare a portfolio to include (1) a brief explanation and contribution to nationalism of:  Louisiana Purchase, Embargo of 1807, War of 1812, Marshall Court Decisions, Adams-Onis Treaty, Monroe Doctrine (2) creation of a visual to show how the American System economically unified the country and (3) examples of cultural developments showing emergence of nationalism in art, architecture, and literature.

Completion of chart on various social, political, economic, and religious issues during the Jeffersonian and Jacksonian eras to show the evolution of democracy.

Essay:  “To what extent did Andrew Jackson’s presidency usher in a new era in American politics?”

Test:  Units 3-4

 

Unit 5:  Slavery and Sectionalism  

 

Readings:

            Text:   The American Pageant  Chapters 16-19

Primary Sources:  The American Spirit  16-19

Handouts

 

Themes:

  1. Manifest Destiny
  2. Slavery as a social and economic institution
  3. Sectionalism

 

Content:

      The Mexican War

      The politics of slavery

  • Missouri Compromise
  • Compromise of 1850
  • Kansas-Nebraska Act
  • Dred Scott Decision
  • Lincoln-Douglas Debates
  • John Brown’s Raid
  • Election of 1860

 

Major assignments and assessments

Map:  Territorial expansion to 1853 and evaluation of sectional differences.

Graphic organizer showing conflicts and compromises leading to Civil War

Writing assignment: “Letter from Kansas”  Assume the role of a settler in Kansas

Territory  and write a letter to your family back in North Carolina  explaining  the

situation there.

DBQ:  The 1850’s:  Prelude to the Civil War or 2005B DBQ:  Failure of Compromise by 1860.


 

Unit 6:  Civil War and Reconstruction  

 

Readings:

            Text:  The American Pageant  Chapters 20-22

            Primary Sources:  The American Spirit  20-22

            Essays: The Interpretation of American History, Vol. I, Number 10, “The Civil War:  Repressible or Irrepressible?”  (essays by Allan Vevins and William W. Freehling) and Vol. Two, Number 2 “Reconstruction:  Change or Stasis?”  (essays by Jonathan M. Wiener and Eric Foner)

            Handouts

 

Themes:

  1. Secession and war
  2. Reconstruction issues and plans
  3. The struggle for equality

 

Content:

            Military strategies, strengths and weaknesses, events and outcomes

            The home front, North and South

  • Mobilizing manpower, finances, public opinion
  • Social, economic, and political impact of the war

Presidential vs. congressional Reconstruction plans and actions

Post war economic developments in the South

1877 Compromise and Home Rule

 

Major Assignments and Assessments:

Written assignment:  Research and report on local history----The Battle of Goldsboro Bridge, The Battle of Whitehall, or the Battle of Bentonville

Small group activity:  Create your own plan for reconstruction

            1996 DBQ:  Civil War and Reconstruction

            Test:  Units 5-6

           

 

Unit 7:   The Gilded Age 

 

Readings:

            Text:  The American Pageant  Chapters 23-26

            Primary sources:  The American Spirit:  23-26

            Essays:  The Interpretation of American History, Vol. II, Number 5, “The New Immigration:  Assimilation or Ethnic Pluralism?” (essays by James R. Barrett and George J. Sanchez)

            Handouts                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  


 

Themes:

  1. Politics during the late 1800’s
  2. The implications of the growth of American industry
  3. Settlement of the Great West
  4. Agrarian discontent

 

Content:

Corruption in politics at all levels of government

            Civil Service Reform

            Tariff issues

            New technologies

            Rise of big business and big businessmen

            Rise of organized labor

            Growth of cities

            The “new” immigrants

            Government policies regarding Native Americans

            Farming, mining, and ranching

            Turner’s thesis

            Populism        

 

 

Major Assignments and Assessments:

            Evaluation of DBQ type documents and questions on the philosophy of the industrialists

            Create your own DBQ:  Evaluate documents and create a question for a DBQ on the Populist movement.

           

 

Unit 8:  Imperialism and Progressivism

 

Readings

            Text:  The American Pageant  Chapters 27-30

            Primary Sources:  The American Spirit:  27-30

            Essays:  The Interpretation of American History, Vol. II, Number 4, “ American Imperialism:  Economic Expansion or Ideological Crusade?”  (Essays by Walter LaFeber and Gerald F. Linderman)

            Handouts

 

Themes:

  1. The changing role of the United States in world affairs
  2. Efforts to improve American society by the Progressive reformers


 

Content: 

            Hawaii and Pacific Islands

            Spanish-American War

            The “Open Door” Policy

            The Panama Canal

            The Roosevelt Corollary to the Monroe Doctrine

            Reform movements:

  • Women’s suffrage
  • Increased government regulation of business
  • Consumer protection
  • Conservation
  • Temperance to Prohibition

            Taft’s “Dollar Diplomacy”

            Wilson as a Progressive

 

Major Assignments and Assessments:

            Writing Assignment:  Would you be an advocate for American imperialism or be counted with the anti-imperialists?  Choose one side or the other and construct an essay to support your position.

            Develop a chart on causes of the Spanish American War including a description of the event and the significance of each as a cause of the war

            DBQ 2003 B   The Progressive Era

            Test:  Unit 7-8

 

 

 

Unit 9:  World War I, The Roaring Twenties and the Great Depression

 

Readings

            Text:  The American Pageant Chapters  31, 32,33, and 34

            Primary Sources:  The American Spirit  31, 32, 33 and 34

            Essays:  The Interpretation of American History, Vol. II, Number 7, “The New Deal:  Revolution or Restoration?” (essays by William E. Leuchtenburg and Alan Dawley)

            Handouts

 

 

Themes:

            1..United States involvement in WWI:  Motives, commitment, and post war agreements

            2.  The 1920’s

                        Social changes

                        Government policies and politics

                        Demographic changes and cultural conflicts

                        Economic “Boom”

            3.  The 1930’s

                        Economic “Bust”

                        Depression

                        “New Deal” and the changing role of the Federal Government in American society

                       

Content:

            American Expeditionary Force

            Wilson’s “moral” diplomacy and the Treaty of Versailles

            Propaganda and Civil Liberties:  The Espionage and Sedition Acts

            The Women’s Movement

            Republican Presidents and pro-business policies

            Fundamentalism and the Scopes Trial

            The Red Scare

                        Sacco and Vanzetti

                        Immigration Restrictions

                        The Palmer Raids

            Prohibition and organized crime

            The economy in the 1920’s:  consumers, speculators, and farmers

            The Stock Market Crash

            The Dust Bowl

            Life during the Depression

            FDR and the New Deal

                        “Alphabet Soup”

                        The “court packing scheme”

                        “Good Neighbor” Policy

                        Gains for labor----the Wagner Act     

 

Major Assignments and Assessments:

            Completion of graphic organizer comparing the urban and rural views of the major issues of the 1920’s

            Develop a chart on New Deal programs including the name, purpose, and whether the program would fit into the category of relief, recovery, or reform

            2003 DBQ:  FDR’s response to the Depression

            Test:  Unit 9

                                   

                                   

Unit 10:  WWII and The Beginning of the Cold War

 

Readings

            Text:  The American Pageant:  Chapters 35, 36, and 37

            Primary Sources:  The American Spirit:  35, 36, and 37        

            Handouts

 

Themes:

  1. American military commitment:  fighting the war in Europe and the Pacific
  2. WWII on the home front:  mobilization and demobilization
  3. The United States’ new role in the post war world
  4. Dealing with communism

 

Content:

            Turning points of the war

            Island hopping

            Manhattan project

            Japanese internment

            The United Nations

            Truman Doctrine

            Containment

            Marshall Plan

            Israel

            Post war adjustments

  • “Baby Boom”
  • Levittowns
  • Demographic shifts:  suburbs and the sunbelt

Korean War

 

Major Assignments and Assessments:

Discussion and questions on WWII conferences

            Group reports on comparisons of WWI and WWII including neutrality policies, home front, goals, relations with allies, role in fighting the war, and post war position

 

 

Unit 11:  The 1950’s, 1960’s, and 1970’s

 

Readings:

            Text:  The American Pageant:  Chapters 38, 39, and 40

            Primary Sources:  The American Spirit  38, 39, and 40

            Essays:  The Interpretation of American History, Vol. II, Number 8, “America and The Cold War:  Containment or Hegemony?” (essays by John Lewis Gaddis and H.W. Brands)

            Handouts

 

Themes:

  1. 1.U.S. involvement in the continuing Cold War
  2. Changes in American society:  Conformity to counterculture
  3. The struggle for civil rights and equality
  4. Checks and balances at work in American politics
  5. Continued influence of New Deal on the government’s role in society

 

Content:

            The Eisenhower Doctrine

            The Suez Crisis

            McCarthyism

            U-2 Incident

            Bay of Pigs

            The Cuban Missile Crisis

            The space race and the arms race

            The Vietnam War

            Hippies and protests

            Brown v. Board of Education

            The Civil Rights Movement

  • Martin Luther King
  • The Montgomery Bus Boycott
  • Freedom Rides
  • Freedom Summer
  • Malcolm X
  • The Black Panthers

            Lyndon Johnson and social programs

            Nixon and Triangular Diplomacy

            Richard Nixon and Watergate

            Ford and Carter

            Israelis, Arabs, and oil

            Warren Court decisions

            Feminism

 

Major Assessments and Assignments:

            Civil Rights Oral History Report:  Conduct an interview with someone who can remember the time before the Civil Rights movement and write the story of his/her experiences before, during, and after the movement.

            Completion of graphic organizer to compare the New Deal and the Great Society

            Test: Units 10-11

 

 

Unit 12:  The 1980’s and Beyond

 

Readings:

            Text:  The American Pageant Chapters 41 and 42

            The American Spirit  41 and 42

            Handouts

 

Themes:

  1. The resurgence of conservativism
  2. The end of the Cold War
  3. Emergence of “postindustrial” economy
  4. New “new” immigrants

 

Content:

            “Reaganonmics”

            Mikhail Gorbachev

            The Persian Gulf War

            The Reagan, Bush, and Clinton presidencies

 

Major Assignments and Assessments:

            AP Review:  Whole class group chooses criteria for determining Presidential greatness.  Small groups rank Presidents in different time periods and report to whole class to rank the top and bottom five.

            AP Review:  Complete chart of twenty-two dates giving the event for each date and its significance as a turning point in U.S. History

            AP Review:  U.S. History “Jeopardy” type game

            Final Exam

            

 

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